How to verify checksum on Mac

How to verify checksum on Mac

Verifying SHA-512, SHA-256, SHA-1 and MD5 checksum on Mac using Terminal

Image for postPhoto by Thomas Q on Unsplash

What is a checksum?

A checksum is a sequence of numbers and letters derived from a piece of stored or transmitted digital data for the purpose of detecting errors that may have been introduced during its transmission or storage. It is usually applied to an installation file after it is received from the download server. So if you know the checksum of an original file, you can use it to check whether your copy of the file is identical or not.

To verify the checksum on your Mac first you need to open Terminal app. The Terminal app is in the Utilities folder in Applications. To open it, either open your Applications folder, then open Utilities and double-click on Terminal, or press Command and Spacebar to launch Spotlight and type ?Terminal? then double-click the search result or simply press Enter.

Before you start verifying the specific checksum

To verify the specific checksum you should type the specific command to verify that checksum followed by /the/full/path/to/your/file.

The full path to your file should include the file extension. Instead of typing the full path you can just drag and drop the file to the Terminal.

For example: Let?s say you downloaded your file to the Downloads folder. Then the full path should look like this:

/Users/Username/Downloads/file-name.extension

Or like this:

~/Downloads/file-name.extension

The symbol ~ (Tilde) in virtually all modern Unix shells is shorthand for your home directory. On OS X or macOS, this expands to /Users/Username.

Verifying SHA-512 checksum

Method 1:

  1. Type the following command in your Terminal:

shasum -a 512 /full/path/to/your/file

Or you can type the command shasum -a 512 followed by space and drag and drop the file to the Terminal.

Example:

shasum -a 512 /Users/Username/Downloads/clear-30390-live-desktop.iso.xz

It should look like this:

Image for postVerifying SHA-512 checksum on Mac

2. Press Enter

Wait a while and you should see the checksum on a new line followed by /the/full/path/to/your/file.

It should look like this:

Image for postSHA-512 checksum on Mac

3. Copy the checksum

Image for postCopying SHA-512 checksum on Mac

and verify if it?s identical with the original one. You can use Diffchecker to find any deferences between them.

Method 2: Using OpenSSL to verify SHA-512

  1. Type the following command in your Terminal:

openssl sha512 /full/path/to/your/file

Or you can type the command openssl sha512 followed by space and drag and drop the file to the Terminal.

Example:

openssl sha512 /Users/Username/Downloads/clear-30390-live-desktop.iso.xz

It should look like this:

Image for postVerifying SHA-512 checksum on Mac using OpenSSL

2. Press Enter

Wait a while and you should see SHA512(/the/full/path/to/your/file)= followed by the checksum.

It should look like this:

Image for postSHA-512 checksum on Mac verified using OpenSSL

3. Copy the checksum

Image for postCopying SHA-512 checksum on Mac verified using OpenSSL

and verify if it?s identical with the original one. You can use Diffchecker to find any deferences between them.

Verifying SHA-256 checksum

Method 1:

  1. Type the following command in your Terminal:

shasum -a 256 /full/path/to/your/file

Or you can type the command shasum -a 256 followed by space and drag and drop the file to the Terminal.

Example:

shasum -a 256 /Users/Username/Downloads/clear-30390-live-desktop.iso.xz

It should look like this:

Image for postVerifying SHA-256 checksum on Mac

2. Press Enter

Wait a while and you should see the checksum on a new line followed by /the/full/path/to/your/file.

It should look like this:

Image for postSHA-256 checksum on Mac

3. Copy the checksum

Image for postCopying SHA-256 checksum on Mac

and verify if it?s identical with the original one. You can use Diffchecker to find any deferences between them.

Method 2: Using OpenSSL to verify SHA-256

  1. Type the following command in your Terminal:

openssl sha256 /full/path/to/your/file

Or you can type the command openssl sha256 followed by space and drag and drop the file to the Terminal.

Example:

openssl sha256 /Users/Username/Downloads/clear-30390-live-desktop.iso.xz

It should look like this:

Image for postVerifying SHA-256 checksum on Mac using OpenSSL

2. Press Enter

Wait a while and you should see SHA256(/the/full/path/to/your/file)= followed by the checksum.

It should look like this:

Image for postSHA-256 checksum on Mac verified using OpenSSL

3. Copy the checksum

Image for postCopying SHA-256 checksum on Mac verified using OpenSSL

and verify if it?s identical with the original one. You can use Diffchecker to find any deferences between them.

Verifying SHA-1 checksum

Method 1:

  1. Type the following command in your Terminal:

shasum -a 1 /full/path/to/your/file

Or you can type the command shasum -a 1 followed by space and drag and drop the file to the Terminal.

Example:

shasum -a 1 /Users/Username/Downloads/clear-30390-live-desktop.iso.xz

It should look like this:

Image for postVerifying SHA-1 checksum on Mac

2. Press Enter

Wait a while and you should see the checksum on a new line followed by /the/full/path/to/your/file.

It should look like this:

Image for postSHA-1 checksum on Mac

3. Copy the checksum

Image for postCopying SHA-1 checksum on Mac

and verify if it?s identical with the original one. You can use Diffchecker to find any deferences between them.

Method 2: Using OpenSSL to verify SHA-1

  1. Type the following command in your Terminal:

openssl sha1 /full/path/to/your/file

Or you can type the command openssl sha1 followed by space and drag and drop the file to the Terminal.

Example:

openssl sha1 /Users/Username/Downloads/clear-30390-live-desktop.iso.xz

It should look like this:

Image for postVerifying SHA-1 checksum on Mac using OpenSSL

2. Press Enter

Wait a while and you should see SHA1(/the/full/path/to/your/file)= followed by the checksum.

It should look like this:

Image for postSHA-1 checksum on Mac verified using OpenSSL

3. Copy the checksum

Image for postCopying SHA-1 checksum on Mac verified using OpenSSL

and verify if it?s identical with the original one. You can use Diffchecker to find any deferences between them.

Verifying MD5 checksum

MD5 is no longer recommended as a checksum hash for security reasons, but some legacy programs may still use it.

Method 1:

  1. Type the following command in your Terminal:

md5 /full/path/to/your/file

Or you can type the command md5 followed by space and drag and drop the file to the Terminal.

Example:

md5 /Users/Username/Downloads/clear-30390-live-desktop.iso.xz

It should look like this:

Image for postVerifying MD5 checksum on Mac

2. Press Enter

Wait a while and you should see MD5 (/the/full/path/to/your/file) = followed by the the checksum.

It should look like this:

Image for postMD5 checksum on Mac

3. Copy the checksum

Image for postCopying MD5 checksum on Mac

and verify if it?s identical with the original one. You can use Diffchecker to find any deferences between them.

Method 2: Using OpenSSL to verify MD5

  1. Type the following command in your Terminal:

openssl md5 /full/path/to/your/file

Or you can type the command openssl md5 followed by space and drag and drop the file to the Terminal.

Example:

openssl md5 /Users/Username/Downloads/clear-30390-live-desktop.iso.xz

It should look like this:

Image for postVerifying MD5 checksum on Mac using OpenSSL

2. Press Enter

Wait a while and you should see MD5(/the/full/path/to/your/file)= followed by the checksum.

It should look like this:

Image for postMD5 checksum on Mac verified using OpenSSL

3. Copy the checksum

Image for postCopying MD5 checksum on Mac verified using OpenSSL

and verify if it?s identical with the original one. You can use Diffchecker to find any deferences between them.

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